WORKING WITH THE WHOLE: GENDERED RESPONSES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IMPACTED BY DOMESTIC ABUSE

DVIP Conference

Tuesday 27th February 2018

Resource for London, 356 Holloway Rd, London N7 6PA

10.00-16.30

With one in five children witnessing some form of domestic abuse and an increasing number of young people experiencing domestic abuse in their close relationships, it’s vital that children and young people are given a space to be heard and supported.

Join us in exploring the impact of domestic abuse on children and young people within a gendered analysis of violence against women and girls. Do all children and young people experience domestic abuse in the same ways? What are the existing and emerging good practices in working with children and young people affected by domestic abuse? How does domestic abuse experienced by children and young people interact with other forms of violence and abuse? How can we ensure children and young people’s voices are heard?

For more information and to book your place:

http://www.dvip.org/conferences.htm 

Making work with perpetrators safe and effective event evaluation – You said, we listened!

Thank you to all those who attended the 8.11.17 event and to 33 delegates who took the time to participate in the evaluation survey.

Dame Vera Baird QC, Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner and Respect Patron, chairing Respect’s event

Key points:

  • 90% found the registration process extremely easy or quite easy
  • 90% strongly agreed or agreed that the event was well organized
  • 81% strongly agreed or agreed that the venue was suitable for the event
  • On average, 66% of speakers were rated as excellent or very good
  • 58% of workshops were rated as excellent or very good
  • 81% would attend Respect’s events again in future

Your comments, our response and planned actions:

“You didn’t show all of the video on a survivor’s story which was really disappointing.”

The audio from the survivor was played in full, but due to the settings at the venue it started from the beginning after finishing, creating the impression that we didn’t play all of it.

What we will do next time: we will try to disable the function that plays clips on a loop.

“To be honest the venue was hard to find and the directions link only got me lost”

We apologise the directions we included got you lost.

What we will do next time: we will include better instructions with maps and timings to make it easier to find the venue.

“A bit more information on the workshops (rather than just a title) to help inform which will be useful.”

What we will do next time: we will work with workshop facilitators to ensure we provide more information, including style of delivery. Thank you for your suggestion.

“A later starting time would really be appreciated so that those of us making a large effort to travel down from the North East or beyond do not have to always walk in late to events.”

It is always difficult balancing convenient timings with enough content to justify the event price, but we are taking your feedback on board.

What we will do next time: we will start our next event at 10:30, finishing at 16:00. Thank you for your suggestion.

“The day was well chaired and to time, the speakers (largely) excellent and there was a real buzz and enthusiasm for the whole event”

We are delighted with your feedback, thank you for taking the time to let us know.

“The presentation from Temporary Superintendent Deborah Alderson, Northumbria Police was excellent and has enabled me to identify a change locally which would be in line with other developments”

We are pleased with your feedback, we will make sure we let Deborah know.

“Very inspiring event. I wish more commissioners around the country would attend and take on board the benefits of commissioning a Respect model.”

We are delighted you enjoyed the event. We are working hard to ensure more Commissioners take on board the benefits of commissioning Respect accredited services.

Jo Todd, Respect’s CEO introducing the new Respect Standard
Jo Todd, Respect’s CEO introducing the new Respect Standard.

Frontline Workers supporting domestic violence victims (male or female) are needed for groundbreaking research project

Do you work with domestic violence victims? Your professional experience is needed to inform research.

Research project title

Codesigning Support Solutions for Victims of Cyberstalking and Abuse: reclaiming privacy and safety on the Internet of Things

Academic Institution

UAL Central Saint Martins

Researcher

Roxanne Leitão.

Aims of research

To understand the threats that novel technologies may pose to victims of domestic abuse; focussing on technology-enabled forms of staking and abuse, as well as what can be done to provide better support to victims going through this.

Roxanne said that:

“The research uses collaborative design methods to address cyber-enabled stalking and harassment within abusive relationships. It will involve domestic abuse (DA) survivors and professionals (support and social workers) dealing with DA, in creating solutions that could improve DA service provision, from both the perspectives of service-users and service-providers. At this stage, I am asking professionals to take part in an interview that will be about an hour long and will focus on their experience of providing support to DA victims, with a focus on technology-enabled forms of abuse and revenge porn.”

For more information, you can download the Practitioners Information Sheet or contact r.leitao@csm.arts.ac.uk

North East Respect Standard launch

Press Release from Respect

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday 28th November 2017

 Northumbria Police & Crime Commissioner Dame Vera Baird QC hosts special event on safe and effective services for perpetrators of domestic violence and abuse

 On Day 4 of the annual 16 Days of Action to End Violence Against Women & Girls, specialist charity holds North East launch of its Respect Standard for work with perpetrators, which focuses on behaviour change and risk management, and above all has safety of domestic violence and abuse survivors and their children at its heart.

Respect – the leading voice in the UK on working with perpetrators of domestic violence and abuse – today (28th November 2017) introduces the 3rd edition of its specialist quality standard in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

The Respect Standard sets the bar for effective work with perpetrators of domestic violence and abuse, with the main aim of keeping past, present and future victims and survivors safer.

The Respect Standard has already received endorsement from a range of professionals, specialist agencies and individual victims and survivors of domestic violence and abuse.

A female survivor whose male partner used a Respect accredited service said:

“It all made sense when I read the standards, not just what the group was about but how this was a service for me, my safety and my children’s safety. The Respect Standard gave me real peace of mind.”

Dame Vera Baird QC, Police & Crime Commissioner for Northumbria, who recently became an official patron of Respect and will host today’s event said:

“As a Police and Crime Commissioner, I want to ensure I spend my budget wisely on good quality interventions which are effective, but most of all which are safe.

It is all too easy to fund something cheap, but it is a false economy and in the worst cases could actually be dangerous, giving the survivor and other agencies the sense that the perpetrator’s risk was being managed and that there was a chance of change, when that isn’t the case.

The Respect Standard has been carefully researched and reflects best practice at the current time. Work with perpetrators is a relatively new field and is evolving quickly and it’s good to know that the standard is regularly reviewed to reflect emerging knowledge.

It is also great to see a section on innovation, which will help those planning new, un-tested interventions, to develop them in a safe way.”

Respect is aiming to increase the number of accredited services, and to encourage commissioners and funders to use Respect accreditation as a core criterion when choosing which services to support.

Respect Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Jo Todd added:

“Survivors deserve more than support; they need to know that agencies are working together to deal with perpetrators effectively.

That means providing opportunities for perpetrators to change, but it also means holding them to account and taking steps to disrupt and prevent future violence and abuse.

The Standard will support service providers to ensure they’re providing quality services that do no harm, and will enable commissioners to make informed and responsible decisions about what services to fund.”

A man who completed a Respect accredited programme also commented:

“I thought I could never defeat the demon inside of me but the service taught me some incredible tools to change my ways and to help me stay on the straight and narrow. Even when things go wobbly, because of the service I am able to pull myself together.”

Ms Todd added:

“If you’re hurting someone you love, you can choose to stop; contact the Respect Phoneline on 0808 802 4040 for help.

Or if you’re concerned about someone’s violent or abusive behaviour, you can also get in touch via the confidential phoneline, email or web chat.”

(612 words)

ENDS

For more information and interviews:

Katie Russell: media@respect.uk.net

 http://respect.uk.net/  

 Notes to editors:

 

  1. The Respect Phonelineis a confidential helpline, email and webchat service for perpetrators of domestic violence looking for help to stop. The service helps male and female perpetrators, in heterosexual or same-sex relationships. Partners or ex-partners of perpetrators, as well as concerned friends and family members and Frontline Workers are also welcome to contact the service for information, advice and support. The phoneline and email service are available Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm on 0808 802 4040 (free from landlines and most mobiles) or info@respectphoneline.org.uk. Web chat is available Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10am until 4pm: http://respectphoneline.org.uk/
  2. According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), 26% of women and 14% of men had experienced domestic abuse since the age of 16, equivalent to an estimated 4.3 million female victims and 2.2 million male victims: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/compendium/focusonviolentcrimeandsexualoffences/yearendingmarch2016/domesticabusesexualassaultandstalking
  3. Organisations and commissioners who run or commission programmes and services for perpetrators of domestic violence and abuse and would like to apply for accreditation against or adopt the Respect Standard can find more information here: http://respect.uk.net/what-we-do/accreditation/

Experts, academics and Government Endorse Specialist Quality Standard for Work With Domestic Violence and Abuse Perpetrators

Media Release from Respect

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday 15th November 2017

Experts, academics and Government Endorse Specialist Quality Standard for Work With Domestic Violence and Abuse Perpetrators

Ahead of promised landmark Domestic Violence and Abuse Bill, leading charity Respect publishes new version of its Standard, to keep past, present and future victims and survivors safer

Respect – the leading voice in the UK on working with perpetrators of domestic violence and abuse – today launches the 3rd edition of its specialist quality standard, with foreword and endorsement from the Home Office.

The Respect Standard sets the bar for effective work with perpetrators of domestic violence and abuse, with the main aim of keeping past, present and future victims and survivors safer.

Victoria Atkins, Minister for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability, said:

“Domestic abuse is an abhorrent crime that affects victims, their families and their wider communities.

“In my new role as Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability Minister I am determined to continue the good work of this Government to protect anyone facing the threat of domestic abuse, identify and pursue offenders and put a stop to their abusive behaviour.

“The Respect Standard is crucial in the fight against domestic abuse. It ensures perpetrator interventions are safe and effective in preventing future abuse and in turn allows victims to rebuild their lives.”

An official launch event for the Standard will take place at the House of Commons later today, hosted by Thangam Debonnaire MP and attended by 60 invited guests, including specialists in the field of domestic violence and abuse and parliamentarians with an interest in this vital work.

The Respect Standard has already received endorsement from a range of professionals, specialist agencies and individual victims and survivors of domestic violence and abuse.

A female survivor whose male partner used a Respect accredited service said:

“It all made sense when I read the standards, not just what the group was about but how this was a service for me, my safety and my children’s safety. The Respect Standard gave me real peace of mind.”

Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of Women’s Aid commented:

“The needs of survivors must come first in any work that is carried out with perpetrators of domestic abuse. That’s why we endorse Respect’s updated Respect Standard which ensures that any work with perpetrators is done safely and effectively with survivors’ needs at its heart.

“Respect recognises that domestic abuse is far from gender neutral, that women’s inequality is both a root cause and a consequence of domestic abuse and that domestic abuse is a pattern of behaviours overwhelmingly used by men to exert their power and control over women. The Respect Standard also guarantees that any work with perpetrators of domestic abuse also provides robust and safe support for survivors by ensuring that a parallel programme for survivors runs alongside any work with perpetrators.”

Respect is aiming to increase the number of accredited services, and to encourage commissioners and funders to use Respect accreditation as a core criterion when choosing which services to support.

Dame Vera Baird QC, Police & Crime Commissioner for Northumbria, who last week became an official patron of Respect, said:

“As a Police and Crime Commissioner, I want to ensure I spend my budget wisely on good quality interventions which are effective, but most of all which are safe.

It is all too easy to fund something cheap, but it is a false economy and in the worst cases could actually be dangerous, giving the survivor and other agencies the sense that the perpetrator’s risk was being managed and that there was a chance of change, when that isn’t the case.

The Respect Standard has been carefully researched and reflects best practice at the current time. Work with perpetrators is a relatively new field and is evolving quickly and it’s good to know that the standard is regularly reviewed to reflect emerging knowledge.

It is also great to see a section on innovation, which will help those planning new, un-tested interventions, to develop them in a safe way.”

Diana Barran, Chief Executive of domestic abuse charity SafeLives commented:

“SafeLives recognises the importance of safe and effective work with perpetrators and we welcome the third edition of the Respect standards.

In particular we are pleased to see the evolution of the standards, which now recognise the introduction of new approaches to managing the behaviour of perpetrators while retaining a focus on the safety of victims and children.”

Respect Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Jo Todd added:

“Survivors deserve more than support; they need to know that agencies are working together to deal with perpetrators effectively.

That means providing opportunities for perpetrators to change, but it also means holding them to account and taking steps to disrupt and prevent future violence and abuse.

The Standard will support service providers to ensure they’re providing quality services that do no harm, and will enable commissioners to make informed and responsible decisions about what services to fund.”

A man who completed a Respect accredited programme also commented:

“I thought I could never defeat the demon inside of me but the service taught me some incredible tools to change my ways and to help me stay on the straight and narrow. Even when things go wobbly, because of the service I am able to pull myself together.”

Ms Todd added:

“If you’re hurting someone you love, you can choose to stop; contact the Respect Phoneline on 0808 802 4040 for help. Or if you’re concerned about someone’s violent or abusive behaviour, you can also get in touch via the confidential phoneline, email or web chat.”

(920 words)

ENDS

For more information and interviews:
Katie Russell: media@respect.uk.net

http://respect.uk.net/

Notes to editors:

1. The Respect Phoneline is a confidential helpline, email and webchat service for perpetrators of domestic violence looking for help to stop. The service helps male and female perpetrators, in heterosexual or same-sex relationships. Partners or ex-partners of perpetrators, as well as concerned friends and family members and Frontline Workers are also welcome to contact the service for information, advice and support. The phoneline and email service are available Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm on 0808 802 4040 (free from landlines and most mobiles) or info@respectphoneline.org.uk. Web chat is available Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10am until 4pm: http://respectphoneline.org.uk/
2. According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), 26% of women and 14% of men had experienced domestic abuse since the age of 16, equivalent to an estimated 4.3 million female victims and 2.2 million male victims: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/compendium/focusonviolentcrimeandsexualoffences/yearendingmarch2016/domesticabusesexualassaultandstalking

Q&A with Roxanne Leitao

“Given the recent rise of abusive, controlling and coercive behaviours enabled by modern technology, alongside a general lack of know how in how to deal with these issues, I felt that this was the best field for me to apply my efforts on over the 3 years of my PhD.”

Roxanne Leitao is a website designer and developer. Respect has been fortunate enough to have Roxanne volunteering her time and skills in the last year to design and build our new website.

Roxanne’s work focusses on interactive design research and practice. She has been involved in a wide range of projects related to healthcare and security, with audiences varying from children and adults with chronic conditions, to clinicians, nurses, law-enforcement agents, and military surgeons. Selected work by Roxanne can be found here:  http://roxanneleitao.com/web/ 

Roxanne is currently completing a PhD at the UAL looking into the use of technology in abusive relationships, and how we can improve support for victims experiencing technology-enabled violence and abuse.

Why did you choose Respect to volunteer with, what was different about this domestic violence organisation that attracted you?

I have been volunteering within the domestic violence sector for a while and I’m currently doing a PhD that focusses on the forms of domestic abuse enabled by new technologies (e.g., smartphones and the Internet of Things). When I moved to London last year, I was attracted to Respect because of its work with perpetrators and male victims, but also by the fact that Respect is an accrediting organization, delivering training and best practice for professionals working in this field.

Respect’s new website is now live. What were the challenges throughout the consultation, design and website building process?

I think the main challenges were related to time a resource management. Especially when other commitments got in the way of being able to dedicate more time to my volunteering activities.

You are currently doing a PhD in technology and domestic violence at UAL. What prompted you to bring together your work as a digital interaction designer and the design of services for survivors?

I’ve always been interested in gender issues and have volunteered within the domestic abuse sector for a while. My work as a designer and researcher started in the field of technology for healthcare and later moved into cybersecurity and crime. Domestic violence is not only a grave human rights issue, it is also a crime and severely impacts upon the health of the victim and all those witnessing the abuse.

Given the recent rise of abusive, controlling and coercive behaviours enabled by modern technology, alongside a general lack of know how in how to deal with these issues, I felt that this was the best field for me to apply my efforts on over the 3 years of my PhD.

The PhD is practice-based, which means that I will be creating prototype solutions to improve support for victims experiencing technology-enable abuse. During the course of the PhD these prototypes will be tested and evaluated with the aim of creating a solution that works and can be implemented in real-world scenarios. It is fundamental to myself, and my supervision team, that we work alongside domestic abuse support workers and survivors to collaboratively create these solutions.

Why is it important to think about the digital services provided by domestic violence organisations and the way they are designed and built?

Especially looking at organisations that do not engage in a lot of face-to-face contact, much of the support provided is delivered over the phone, text, and/or email. Meaning that these often impersonal modes of communication are the primary experience of clients seeking support.

Improving the ways in which information can be communicated and shared is therefore of primary importance. Even more so when we consider the younger generations who are often more comfortable in seeking information and support from online sources.

Not only is managing and designing the experience of seeking online support essential, but it also offers us the opportunity to address barriers to communication, such as, translation and interpretation issues, office working hours and when clients are actually available, and allowing clients to access the information where and when they can. Technology has the potential, for example, to make support and information available even when support workers aren’t in the office and in languages that the support workers do not speak.

In what ways you do think this can help domestic violence survivors in future?

The exact form of the product and/or service that we will develop, during my PhD,  is part of an ongoing collaboration with survivors and support workers. It will be based on what they highlight as being their biggest needs and priorities. At this early stage we are reluctant to define exactly what it will be. What I can say is that it will be informed by real-world needs which we will use our technical expertise to bring to life, in a product/service that improves the current status quo for support workers and survivors.

 

If you work in the domestic abuse field, or are a survivor, and are interested in being part of this project (or just having a chat about it) please Roxanne on: r.leitao@csm.arts.ac.uk

Events Q&A – Respect newsletter August 2017

Name: Julia Hawkins

Job title: Membership, Training and Events Officer

Surprising fact about you: I speak four languages

What’s your favourite part of running Respect events?:

The amazing thing about running Respect Events is that we get professionals coming from everywhere around the country.

It becomes an amazing hub of national knowledge where we have specialist practitioners, service managers, commissioners, and a range of partners from the broader coordinated community response committed to ending domestic abuse in one room.

We have expert guest speaking and leading workshops from the UK and beyond. Put this all together, you have a powerful and inspiring mix of people learning from and sharing with each other.

What Respect events have you run recently?:

The last event we ran was the national working with perpetrator conference Perpetrators: Innovations in practice and policy. This was one of our most successful events to date which sold out and had an incredible range of themes and topics presented by speakers and the workshops.

For example, at this event we had Professor Liz Kelly present on the on-going lessons since Mirabal, and Dr Polly Radcliffe from King’s College London speaking on treatment approaches for men in substance abuse rehabilitation who also perpetrate intimate partner violence.

Our workshop topics were so rich and varied, from working with women who use intimate partner violence, to exploring challenges and opportunities specialist organisations face when developing a pilot with non-specialist partners, and looking at work with perpetrators in honour based cultures.

The event has a bit of everything from research, to partnership working, and practice. It truly is an incredible day networking with such inspirational peers.

What Respect events are coming up?:

The next event we have coming up is Working with Young People – Making a Difference on 19th September 2017.

The event will highlight new approaches to:

  • Adolescent to parent and carer violence
  • Trauma informed work with young people
  • Violence and abuse from adopted young people
  • Supporting parents affected by young people’s violence and abuse
  • Working with young people with sexually harmful behaviour

What part of the Respect Young People’s event are you most excited about?:

I am excited about all of it! You can see a link to the full agenda here.

Some highlights we have are Great Behaviour Breakdown Instructors Zach Gomm and Denise Golding sharing their therapeutic approach to working with troubled young people and Doireann Larkin from Tender will be talking about arts based approaches to tackling domestic abuse.

We will have workshops on working with young fathers using abusive behaviours, and a look at non-violent resistance parenting approach.

It is set to be a fantastic day for practitioners and managers alike for improving practice and networking with experts in the field.

Who are Respect events suitable for?:

This event is great for all those working with young people’s violence and abuse in familial and intimate relationships. Particularly professionals in social work, youth offending teams, family support, parenting,  education, domestic abuse and those developing responses to young people who are a risk to others.

How can people get involved in Respect events?:

We are always wanting to know what is happening out there and want to learn from you. So if you have any interesting work, research, or policy developments you are involved in and would like to share this in our events as a speaker or a workshop, do get in touch with me via email. I would love to have a chat!

How can people book tickets for Respect events?:

Booking for Respect events (as well as training) is online only: quick, easy and secure, with a range of payment options. If you would like to book onto our Young People event, do so here.

We also have our next national Perpetrator Event coming up on 8th November 2017. Find out more here.

June Practice Development Day

On the 12th of June, Respect ran what turned out to be a very successful Practice Development Day (PDD). The event was in Stoke-on-Trent for Respect Specialist Provider Members who work with perpetrators.

Born out of listening to our members’ needs, the PDD is a space for practitioner led sessions where current, relevant or complex topics about working with perpetrators are discussed. This is soon to be expanded to Respect Specialist Provider Members who work with male victims and young people who use violence and abuse.

At the last PDD, topics such as LGBT interventions for domestic violence perpetrators, and restorative justice. We also had four workshops, including looking at “The strengths and challenges of safe information sharing between integrated support services and perpetrator programmes”, and one on video monitoring for practice supervision.

The benefits of this event is that they are designed specifically for frontline staff, topics and workshops are highly specialised and relevant, and they are kept small to ensure the best learning experience for our members.

You can hear what our members themselves think of the day:

“I find the support from Respect and Respect Members invaluable to the safe running of our project and feel very proud to be part of this very important work”.

Our PDDs are open to Specialist Provider Members of Respect who are working towards Respect Accreditation for perpetrator work, or to the wider pool of those working with male victims or young people who use violence and abuse. To join, apply today.